Progress Charts

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You can use multiple reports to track your progress as you work through releases and current iterations. For most of these charts, you can either add them as an app on your dashboard or drag them on to your desktop to create a screenshot to include in presentations.

Your ability to generate and view charts is dependent upon the project access rights you have been assigned by your administrator. Data collection occurs at midnight based on the workspace timezone setting.

Use any of these progress charts:

Build Health by Iteration chart

The Build Health by Iteration chart helps you analyze your build information using time boxes (such as iterations) that are significant to your project.

The chart helps you detect trends and consider questions like:

  • Does the build data reflect your opinions about which iterations were troublesome?
  • Can you use build health as an indicator for process changes?
  • Is there evidence of learning from iteration to iteration?
  • Is there any correlation between build health and number of builds in an iteration?

Build Health by Iteration

For each iteration, you can see the number of builds with a successful, failed, incomplete, or unknown status, and the average build duration in seconds. Hover over any colored portion of the iteration bar to see the total number of builds for the corresponding status. The chart reports builds for the last 10 iterations.

The chart uses your project scope setting to identify iterations.

Although it is not recommended, Rally allows you to specify overlapping iterations or gaps between iterations. If an overlap is greater than a day, the chart will display a message rather than return ambiguous data. In this case, adjust your project scope to a level where iterations do not overlap, or adjust the date boundaries of your iterations so they do not overlap.

When builds exist in a gap between iterations, they will be grouped with the previous iteration.

Builds are identified by looking both up and down your project hierarchy, regardless of your project scope setting. This supports the organization of a project or product line with subteams that share the same build definitions and SCM repositories. Watch Understanding the Project Hierarchy and see Set Up Your Project Hierarchy to learn how to organize projects and teams in Rally.

Note: A status of Unknown may indicate a problem with an external program called during the build process. Check to see if the program hangs (reporting back nothing), or if it reports back something that our build script is not designed to handle.

Iteration Defects by Priority chart

The Iteration Defects by Priority chart provides an at-a-glance view of all defects in the selected iteration, categorized by priority and with any state value other than Closed. Use this chart to help you quickly track and recognize the number of defects of greatest importance, and to ensure defect resolution is progressing in line with the iteration time line. This chart is helpful to verify that the most important defects are resolved first.

Iteration Defects by Priority

The Iteration Defect Priority chart displays a cumulative total of all active defects per day. Defects are arranged by priority with the highest priority defects displayed at the top of the chart in red.

Iteration Defects by State chart

The Iteration Defects by State chart displays all defects, regardless of state value, that are associated with the selected iteration. Hover over any bar section to display the exact number of defects in each state per day. Use this chart to help you monitor the defect resolution trend and ensure that you are making progress toward zero defects for the end of the iteration.

The Iteration Defect State chart displays a cumulative total of all defects per day and their related states. The goal is to have all defects reported as closed on or before the last day of the iteration.

Note: The two variations of this chart report data in the iteration differently.

From the Iteration Status page:

  • Closed defects are not displayed on the chart.
  • Updates to the State field of defects are reflected on the chart immediately.

From the Reports page, or when installed as an app:

  • Closed defects are displayed on the chart.
  • Updates to the State field of defects directly associated to the iteration are reflected on the chart immediately.
  • Updates to the State field of defects associated to user stories or defect suites in the iteration are reflected on the chart after data collection concludes for the day (12am workspace time).

Iteration Burndown chart

Burndown charts show the progress made toward established milestones and deadlines. They can help answer the question of whether to scope back or extend the schedule. Each day, the estimated work remaining in the current iteration is calculated and graphed, resulting in a burndown chart.

The values for this chart are calculated using two values—the maximum number of task to do at any time within the iteration or release, and the planned end date for the iteration or release.

The amount of work remaining (to do) becomes smaller and smaller as development progresses until it reaches point zero at the end of the current iteration. Conversely, the amount of accepted work (completed, tested, and met acceptance criteria) is graphed in a burnup chart. The amount of work in an accepted state starts at zero and continues to grow until it reaches 100% accepted at the end of the iteration.

The iteration drop-down list displays only current active iterations or iterations that begin in the next 30 days.

Rally offers both perspectives in a single burndown chart. The User Story Workspace type offers an ideal burndown line that is automatically calculated and displayed based on the amount of work left to do compared to the number of days remaining in the iteration. Use this line to determine the team's likelihood of meeting the iteration end date. Hover over any dot on the ideal burndown line to see the exact number of units per day that should be reflected in each daily burndown bar.

iteration burndown

Two axes are displayed on the burndown chart and represent units of measurement: Plan Estimate and Task Estimate. The display has been normalized to contain both entities on the same chart.

Ideal burndown line

The starting point of the ideal burndown is pinned to the maximum task estimate value for the entire iteration. This is also an item that defies the laws of physics: the line can go up, but never down.

For example:  On day 1, there are 40 hours in task estimates so the ideal line starts at 40.  If you add tasks with another 10 hours of estimates, the line moves up and starts at 50.  If you later remove hours the following day or delete a task, the ideal stays at 50.

The line can also represent your to do hours. If your total to do is greater than your task estimate, the chart uses the greater value. The ideal burndown line changes when the to do exceeds the starting point or estimate amounts.

In a perfect sprint, your task estimate should equal your to do value. If you mis-type a to do in the current day, it will move back to the original estimate amount as you burndown or readjust the to do amount.  

Once data collection runs at the end of the first day of the iteration, the starting point of the ideal line is set at either sum[Est] (the sum of the task estimates) or sum[ToDo] (the sum of the task to dos), whichever is greater. 

For the remainder of the iteration, the starting point of the ideal line is increased by daily data collection if either sum[Est] or sum[ToDo] exceeds the current starting point, but the starting point will never go down. 

Iteration Burnup chart

The Iteration Burnup chart helps you track how much work has been accepted so far with a scope line that indicates any change in scope. The amount of accepted work (completed, tested, and met acceptance criteria) is graphed in a burnup chart. The amount of work in an accepted state starts at zero and continues to grow until it reaches 100% accepted at the end of the iteration.

A burnup chart tracks how much work is done, but it shows more information than a burndown chart because it also has a line showing how much work is in the project as whole (the scope as workload), and this can change.

Hover over any section of either line to display the exact number of units accepted and those planned for the release per day.

iteration burnup

Drag the chart onto your desktop to create a screenshot to include in presentations.

Iteration Cumulative Flow diagram

The Iteration Cumulative Flow diagram displays the rolled up states of all scheduled items to help you plan and track your iterations. This diagram displays all scheduled work items for the iteration in incremental collections of days as the horizontal axis. Each day displays the rolled-up states of all scheduled items for the increment. The vertical axis of the chart references the total plan estimates in your specified units.

Use this diagram to:

  • Forecast and track progress: The states of the scheduled work items indicate the progress of your development as it moves to completion. To determine if you are on target to complete the work within the scheduled iteration, track the accepted state.
  • Manage scope: As your scheduled work item bars become level, it is easy to see when excess work is added to an iteration. If the level of the bars do not remain uniform and instead continue to increase, you need to re-address the scope of your iteration.
  • Identify bottlenecks: Use the rolled-up states of your scheduled work items to determine if there are trends that indicate bottlenecks. For example, a large section of scheduled items in a completed state as compared to a small amount of accepted may indicate a testing roadblock.

Hover over any bar section to display the exact number of units in each state per day.

An iteration must contain scheduled items before the Iteration Cumulative Flow diagram displays. The report is generated for the current iteration, but you may select any iteration from the iteration drop-down list at the top of the report.

Iteration Velocity chart

The Iteration Velocity chart displays all accepted plan estimate units for each of the last ten completed iterations. Use this chart to determine your iteration velocity across projects within scope in the current workspace.

Velocity chart

Hover over any bar section to display the exact number of plan estimate units accepted, accepted after the iteration ended, or not accepted.

The Iteration Velocity chart displays values for the last ten (or fewer) iterations. Only iterations whose end dates are earlier than the current date display.

Release Burndown chart

Burndown charts show the progress made toward established milestones and deadlines. They can help answer the question of whether to scope back or extend the schedule. A Release Burndown chart provides the big picture of the status of your release. Use it to track the scheduled items for a release against the scheduled items that have been accepted in the release. The team can oversee the release as it progresses and predict the possibility of meeting release deadlines or milestones.
The Release Burndown chart displays the work remaining for work items per day, contained within the release.

Release Burndown

The Y axis indicates the estimated amount of work remaining to complete the release. As the release progresses, the line decreases as tasks become completed and accepted. The work remaining units are measured in planning units that have been configured for your workspace.

Each day of the release is recorded in the X axis. Hover over each bar to display the exact number of units remaining for each day.

The black total scope line indicates, by day, the sum of the plan estimates of all work items in the release. If no work items are added or removed during the release and if no estimates have changed, the total scope line will be flat for the entire release. If work items are added or removed mid-release or if estimates change, the total scope line will shift up or down appropriately at the point in time when the change occurred.

The Work Remaining (green line) calculates the sum of plan estimates of stories which have not been accepted in the release.

Release Burnup chart

A burnup chart tracks how much work is done. The burnup chart can show more information than a burndown chart because it also has a line showing how much work is in the project as whole (the scope as workload), and this can change.

The burnup chart displays work delivered so far in the release to predict whether the release date will be met.

Hover over any section of either line to display the exact number of units accepted and those planned for the release per day.



Release Cumulative Flow diagram

The Release Cumulative Flow diagram displays the rolled-up states of all scheduled items for a selected release. Use this diagram to easily track the progression of work item states as the release moves toward acceptance. This diagram displays the amount of plan estimate units per state for all stories or work items within a release per day. The Y axis references the amount of plan estimates displayed in your specified units, while the X axis records each day of the release.

Release Cumulative Flow

Use this diagram to:

  • Forecast progress: The states of the scheduled items indicate the progress of your development as it moves to completion. To determine if you are on target to complete the work within the scheduled release, track the accepted state.
  • Manage scope: As your scheduled item bars become level, it is easy to see when excess work is added to a release. The top level of the bars should correlate to the total scope line of your Release Burndown chart. If the level of the bars do not remain uniform and instead continue to increase, you need to re-address the scope of your release.
  • Identify bottlenecks: Use the rolled-up states of your scheduled items to determine if there are trends that indicate bottlenecks. For example, a large section of scheduled items in a completed state as compared to a small amount of accepted may indicate a testing roadblock.

Hover over any bar section to display the exact number of units in each state per day.

Release Defect Trend chart

The Release Defect Trend chart displays the cumulative defects opened versus cumulative defects closed in a release.

This chart shows the accumulation of open defects over a release, the accumulation of closed defects during the release, and an indication of active defects (not cumulative) for each day in the release. The chart displays the rate at which defects are being opened, the rate at which defects are being closed, and the total number of new defects accumulated over the release. The total number of new defects introduced during the release is at the top of the chart.

The red and green lines show the cumulative count of opened and closed defects, while the black line shows per day the number of current defects that are not closed.



Hover over any section of either line to display the exact number of units accepted and those planned for the release per day.

You must leave at least one state unchecked.

Story Burndown chart

The Story Burndown Chart displays the trend of total accepted points across all children stories, with release markers and metrics. Each day, the estimated work remaining to deliver a story is calculated and graphed, resulting in a burndown chart. Stories are frequently scheduled by many teams across many iterations and releases. As a result, the Story Burndown Chart is most useful when tracking features or products that have been defined as a collection of stories organized into an epic hierarchy.

The start date of any Story Burndown Chart is today minus 30 days.

Story metrics are displayed above the Story Burndown chart. Metrics include the following information:

Estimated: Plan estimate
Tasked: How many stories have at least one task
Scheduled in a release: How many stories are scheduled in a release
Number of points versus number of accepted: Points of estimated child stories
story burndown

The green bars represent accepted work and the blue bar represents tasks. The amount of work remaining (Task To Do and Accepted) becomes smaller and smaller as development progresses until it reaches point zero. A red dotted line represents release dates.

To display a Story Burndown chart, enter an ID or keyword (the keyword must include at least three characters) in the Story text box. A Story ID search must include the S before the ID number.

Story keyword search is case-sensitive. Click the magnifying glass icon in the Story search box to return to your previous search results drop-down list.

Story Burnup chart

The Story Burnup chart displays work completed on a story or a feature (epic story) supported by a group of stories. Each day, the work on a story that has been delivered is calculated and graphed, resulting in a burnup chart. Stories are frequently scheduled by many teams across many iterations and releases. As a result, the Story Burnup chart is most useful when tracking features or products that have been defined as a collection of stories organized into an epic hierarchy.

The amount of accepted work (completed, tested, and met acceptance criteria) is graphed in a burnup chart. The amount of work in an accepted state starts at zero and shows the progress of epic stories by reporting over the collection of epic children stories.

A burnup chart tracks how much work is done. The value in the burnup chart is that it clearly illustrates change in scope, whether it is the addition of scheduled stories or a change in an estimate. Scope change is a common challenge for teams.

Story metrics are displayed above the Story Burnup chart. Metrics include the following information:

Estimated: Plan estimate
Scheduled in a release: How many stories are scheduled in a release
Number of points versus number of accepted: Points of estimated child stories
Forecasted completion date: Based on current progress rate and scope, the date will change if scope is added or the progress rate of teams working on the story changes
story burnup

The green bars represent accepted work. The amount of work completed becomes larger and larger as development progresses until it reaches 100% completion. A red dotted line represents release dates.

The Story Burnup chart also includes a trend line. The trend line is the rate work is being accepted (done). The key value of this report is when the trend line intersects the scope line. The intersection of these two lines indicates a forecast of completion. Given that epics (stories) do not have fixed deadlines or dates, this is a unique way to get visibility into the expected delivery of a set of stories, features, and so on.

The Story Burnup chart provides an expected completion date up for epic stories completed in a year or less. A trend line not intersecting the scope line indicates a completion date further than a year away.

The date range on this report is automatic. The report begins when there are estimates on at least one child story. The end date of the report is today if the trend line intersects the scope line today or earlier. Otherwise, the end date is the date when the scope line intersects the trend line or 365 days after today, whichever comes first.

To display a Story Burnup chart, enter an ID or keyword (the keyword must include at least three characters) in the Story text box. Story keyword search is case-sensitive. The report begins when there are estimates on at least one child story.

Tagged Story Burndown chart

The Tagged Story Burndown chart displays the trend of total accepted points aggregated for all stories tagged with a common tag. Each day, the estimated work remaining to deliver a story is calculated and graphed, resulting in a burndown chart. Stories are frequently scheduled by many teams across many iterations and releases. As a result, the Tagged Story Burndown chart is an effective way to report on features or products worked on by multiple teams by leveraging a common tag identifying the various parts of that feature or product.

Story metrics are displayed above the Tagged Story Burndown chart. Metrics include the following information:

Estimated: Plan estimate
Tasked: How many stories have at least one task
Scheduled in a release: How many stories are scheduled in a release
Number of points versus number of accepted: Points of estimated child stories

The green bars represent accepted work and the blue bar represents remaining task hours. The amount of work remaining (Task To Do and Accepted) becomes smaller and smaller as development progresses until it reaches point zero. Red dotted lines represent release dates.

To display a Tagged Story Burndown chart, enter a tag in the Tag text box. Tag keyword search is case-sensitive. The Tagged Story Burndown chart returns story information only (no defects or test cases). The drop-down for start date defaults to today's date minus 30 days. You may set this value to any valid date the tag was in use. Multiple tags are not supported at this time. The name of exported reports is truncated to 15 characters followed by the story number.

tagged story

Story Cumulative Flow diagram

The Story Cumulative Flow diagram helps you track your stories. Use this diagram to easily track the progression of stories as the release moves toward acceptance. This diagram displays all scheduled work items for the iteration in incremental collections of days within an iteration on the horizontal axis. Each day displays the rolled up states of all scheduled items for the increment. The vertical axis references the total plan estimates displayed in your specified units.

story flow

Use these charts to:

  • Forecast and Track Progress: The states of the scheduled work item indicate the progress of your development as it moves to completion. To determine if you are on target to complete the work within the scheduled iteration, track the accepted state.
  • Manage Scope: As your scheduled item bars become level, it is easy to see when excess work is added to an iteration. If the level of the bars do not remain uniform and instead continue to increase, you need to re-address the scope of your iteration.
  • Identify Bottlenecks: Use the rolled-up states of your scheduled items to determine if there are trends that indicate bottlenecks. For example, a large section of scheduled items in a completed state as compared to a small amount of accepted may indicate a testing roadblock.

Hover over any section to display the exact number of units in each state per day.

A story must contain scheduled tasks before the Story Cumulative Flow diagram displays. A story ID search must include the S before the ID number.

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